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Newborn!
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Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


I haven't been drawing all that long-- which means I'm kinda new to trying out different techniques. So here's my question.

What's an effective way to incorporate rain effects into the background of a picture? I've asked around irl, and no one seems to be able to give me any sort of answer. I tried [url=[sign in to see URL] but I can't help but think it looks a little flat when I do it. (User error?)

Any suggestions?
2/6/2015, 7:44 am Link to this post Send Email to LofAtrius   Send PM to LofAtrius Blog
 
Autonymous Rex Profile
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Re: Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


This is what I would do:

First, use a white colored pencil for background elements only. For foreground elements (like the focus of your image), I'd recommend something stronger/brighter. A white gel pen (sakura gelly roll, IMO) works well. Since you want to flick a bit, it's safer than using a dip pen in white ink.

Second, use a ruler. Simply put, the rain that we *are* able to see pretty much travels straight, it down arc like the guy in the video made it. Also, you don't want to use a clean, unbroken line. Break up the line unevenly (short and long-ish streaks).

Third, don't draw all the lines coming from the same angle. You don't want to cross hatch the lines, but some of them will be coming down more parallel to the paper edges, some a bit more angled. It's okay to cross some lines of rain, but don't overdo it, and try not to put too many in a close location. While the trail of a raindrop that we do see is straight, they don't always start and end in paths that are perpendicular to the ground.

Hope that helps! If you're confused, it's normal. I tend to do that to people, so don't hesitate to ask for clarification.

---

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Newborn!
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Re: Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


Thanks for the advice! I do actually have a couple of clarifying points though.


I hadn't thought of using a white gel pen. Is that for the rain effects present in the focus of my image? I'm not sure how to incorporate that, if so. I've never actually used dip pens, interestingly enough, so what are the benefits to using one as opposed to, say, using graphic pens or microns or something similar?

Haha wow it didn't even cross my mind to use a ruler. derp. That's excellent advice!

Yeah, I can see how angling some of the drops would be helpful to keep the background visually interesting, so I'll definitely do that.

Thanks so much for the feedback; yours is the first actual advice I've gotten on the subject! emoticon
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Re: Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


I gotta run to take my son to his basketball game, but when I get back, I'll look into this and see if I can share any help.
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Re: Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


Alright, back from the game. It was a good close game and my son's team won. emoticon

Anyways, this rain effect you're looking to accomplish. Is it on a white background, black background or painted background?
You can achieve a rain effect differently depending on what your background looks like.
If you have a black background, simulating the night, then you can either use a good quill nib with white acrylic ink that's been slightly thinned with water or a very fine brush and a ruler. May take some time and patience to fill up an entire page with rain streaks and splash effects but once you get it done, you can go back in with a black pen or small round brush dipped in black ink and streak away some of the solid white lines, so it looks more random and not so uniform.

If you're working with a white background, simulating day time, you can achieve similar results using the reversed method of the above.

On a painting that is in full color, I've seen people use a very thin round brush, dipped in white ink that's been thinned and carefully draw in the rain drop streaks as well as the tiny dabs of droplets.

There may be other ways to achieve this effect, but the above is the techniques I'm familiar with the most.
I hope this helps some. emoticon

Last edited by Nar Comics, 2/7/2015, 2:07 pm
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Re: Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


The sky and background (whether they are buildings or more nature-oriented), use the pencil. For foreground, use the pen. What is foreground? Well, that depends upon your image. If it has a more close up view of a character, then you'd want to use the gel pen in that area (where the character is) and taper off the strong white as you move away from the character. If you're doing a long shot, where the character is in the middle ground, then use pencil over that, and use gel pen around foreground elements. BUT, use them more sparingly since your focus is still the character (ie you want the strongest white streaks to pull the viewer forward, towards you. If you have your main focus in the foreground, use the strong white rain to draw attention to them. If they are in the distance, use the strong white rain in the foreground as a framing device for the distant focus.

I didn't recommend a dip pen because of the potential for accidental spatter/blobbing on the page (especially since I feel you get a better 'broken' line by zipping the pen along the ruler's edge. IE quickly. The ink doesn't flow fast enough from the pen to catch the entire line, so the broken-ness looks more natural. With a dip pen, you risk catching the paper. Nar is super-awesome with a nib, so I have little doubt he can safely do it with one. However most of us need a lot more nib practice before we can reach that level (and yes, I do recommend learning to use a nib, then a brush. So much more organic, and frankly, it's fun!)

In theory you can use a tech pen, but they can be so touchy (and you have to clean it, fill it, clean it again, etc) that it's almost not worth it.

Also, I admit I did kind of assume it was a colored background, hence suggesting the white pen. I apologize for that. If it's on a white background, there are several techniques you can try: Copic multiliners (and other brands as well) make cool gray liners. Get a 01 to keep on hand. Use that for the background rain (you'll be surprised at how handy that cool gray liner becomes for other things. Also I'd recommend a sepia toned liner to keep on hand as well. Both are great for creating cool and warm toned element separations). Then for the foreground use a black liner pen (like a micron). Just make sure it's not too thick a line.

---

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Newborn!
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Re: Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


Nar: Go team! Good for your son! emoticon

Thanks for the input! I haven't actually tried anything other than white paper, so black would be super-interesting. I'll have to try that with the quill nib. What should I be looking for with a "good nib?" I have 0 experience in this subject, unfortunately.

Those are some rad techniques, man. Thanks for sharing!

Rex: Okay, that makes sense about the pencil for the background. I'd imagine tapering off from the foreground is super-important too, but I'd need to practice that. It sounds complicated. Cool, but complicated.

Oh, okay! Nibs do sound a little bit intimidating, actually, so the practice will definitely be necessary. I can look into getting started with that at least.

Haha, okay! Now we're cooking. I can get a cool grey liner to get started as well as a sepia toned liner for different elements.

Wow that was super-helpful, you guys! Thanks so much! You guys are rad. emoticon
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Time to ROCK!
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Re: Traditional "Artist" SOL on Rain Effects


quote:

LofAtrius wrote:
Wow that was super-helpful, you guys! Thanks so much! You guys are rad. emoticon



Told yuh! emoticon

---
The artist formerly Known as Joe D.!

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